THE PASSING OF PETER McWILLIAMS
medmjsciencelogo.gif (8003 bytes)
note: Scott Imler is a SNITCH!
"LA cannabis buyers club president turns in Todd McCormick and Peter McWilliams"
..Someone once asked him why, since he was living on borrowed time anyway, 
he didn't get a gun and take some of the Drug Warriors to the Hereafter with him.

Peter replied, "My enemy is ignorance, not individuals."  
He said, "It is winning the war of ideas
                     -- through fact, logic, persuasion, and, yes, humor
-- that brings about lasting change."

BREAKING NEWS

Peter McWilliams' funeral will be held Tuesday, June 20, 2000 at 3:00pm 
at the Westwood Memorial Gardens, Westwood Village, 1218 Los Angeles, California 90024.

DIRECTIONS TO CEMETERY CHAPEL

This address is located about 1/2 block off of Wilshire Blvd. (which is the nearest freeway exit, go east, from the San Diego Freeway), driveway looks like an alleyway and is between two apparent parking structures, driveway goes back behind to cemetery, make *right turn* at end of driveway just before parking attendant kiosk (do not park there in those lots), follow driveway into cemetery and you will be able to park in there and you will see small chapel where services will be held.

in attendance was

Mary McWilliams, Michael McWilliams, Jack Herer, Tiffany Neumann, Chris Sanders, 
Genie Britingham, Billy Radar, Holly, Richard Marsalis, 

"There was a beautiful march to the Federal building after the funeral" chris sanders

There is no room for floral arrangements at the memorial gardens.

In lieu of flowers, I would encourage Peter's supporters to make their donations in honor of Peter to organizations and causes of your choice that you know he has supported through his work and tireless efforts. Most of all, give of your time and energy to insure his work will carry on and the goals he has fought for so valiantly over the years are realized. This would truly be the kind of living memorial that would most keep his memory and his spirit alive. Mrs. McWilliams extends her heartfelt gratitude to all those who have supported Peter in his life and who have extended their sympathy and kind words of support since hearing the news of his death.

http://www.pot-tv.com/ The Healing Herb Hour will pay tribute to Peter tomorrow night from 5 to 6 pm Pacific Time. The program will feature Peter's co-defendants, Renee Boje and Todd McCormick. Todd will be speaking from the federal prison in Terminal Island, California. Renee and Todd welcome everyone to tune in to this Monday's show and express your love and respect for Peter McWilliams through their chat lines. Bring poetry, quotes, thoughts, stories, whatever you would like...Renee stated, "I think if enough of us send energy out to him at the same time, he will hear us!"  "After the show, I am planning to do a ceremony in order to say goodbye to Peter's spirit. When night falls, I am going to send some floating candles out into the ocean along with some rose petals and some prayers honoring Peter and sending love and respect out to the Universe in hopes that he will somehow, hear me."

I have used http://www.mapsonus.com/ for maps and directions in the past
and found it easy to use and with accurate directions. Tiffany mentioned
that she had downloaded a map from http://www.yahoo.com/ that was quite
good. (This is a small chapel and Mrs. McWilliams mentioned that you
could almost be standing in front of it, and miss it. If this is any
help, it is the place where Marilyn Monroe is laid to rest.)
Thank you
Ann McCormick

Libertarians AND THE MOVEMENT
Mourn Passing of Medical Marijuana Activist Peter McWilliams


LOS ANGELES -- California Libertarians are mourning the passing of Peter McWilliams, the #1 best selling author of "Ain't Nobody's Business if You Do," "How to Survive the Loss of a Love," and "The Personal Computer Book," who died in his Los Angeles home yesterday at the age of 50.

    McWilliams was an outspoken advocate of medical marijuana.  He was diagnosed with AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in March, 1996 and used medical marijuana to combat the nausea caused by his medical treatments.  He joined the Libertarian Party in 1998 following a nationally televised speech at the Libertarian National Convention.

    "Peter McWilliams was a true hero who fought and ultimately gave his life for what he believed in: the right to heal oneself without government interference," declared Libertarian state chair Mark
Hinkle.

    "His loss opens a gaping hole in the fabric of liberty, but his memory will live on not only in the hearts of grateful Libertarians but also in the lives of the countless patients who will take up the crusade for health freedom."

    McWilliams was arrested in 1998 and charged with conspiracy to sell marijuana plants that he had been growing to supply cooperatives that serve other medical marijuana patients in California.  McWilliams was forced to plead guilty after the federal judge presiding over the case refused to allow any mention of Proposition 215, the landmark 1996 California ballot initiative that legalized medical marijuana.

    At the time of his death, McWilliams was awaiting sentencing on the marijuana charges.  His health was failing after Judge George King ordered McWilliams not to use medical marijuana.  According to sources, McWilliams was found in his bathroom choked on his vomit.

    "The War on Drugs has sadly produced another casualty," said Hinkle.  "Had Peter been allowed to take medical marijuana, he could have kept his nausea under control and probably prevented his death.  Americans should be outraged that the government allowed Peter to die, and Judge King should be held accountable for his decision -- which amounted to a death sentence for Peter.

    "On behalf of all Libertarians, we send our deepest sympathies to his family and friends.  Peter's
exceptional commitment to liberty and freedom was rare, and he will be sorely missed."

Chris Sanders wrote:

I was working with Peter five days before his death.  On the June 9th I came on over to drop off some footage that I had edited. Peter obviously had signs of a stroke.  The right side of his face became paralyzed to wear he could barely talk or keep his spit from staying inside his mouth.  I insisted on taking him to the hospital but he refused.  He said that "this is a normal effect after taking my medication" He was suffering, obviously because he was not even concerned about being naked in front of me or my girlfriend Sarah.  The next day he had a fire.  The fire consumed our master tapes which he had me prepare specifically for Judge King.  Peter wanted to show the Judge a perspective of his life through his friends, research and work.  The fire started at Peter's desk and from my speculation was caused by too many electrical units plugged in at the floor.   The fire trapped Peter in his room upstairs, who was already suffering from a minor stroke.  Billy Radar helped break  him out of his burning house.  Peter still refused to go to the hospital.  After being rescued Peter stayed two days in his guest house not moving from the loft bed.  The next day he was found in his burned house's bathroom by his maid, Natalie.  His last moments were spent going through burned material.  The fire and its toxins, a stroke,  combined with the loss of several years work - killed him.  After the funeral I had learned through Natalie that his medication was changed the day he had a stroke.  Peter was not aware of the change because it overpowered him.  He discovered St. John's Wort as a healing herb for depression and created a New York Times bestseller.   I would have never believed it if I had not seen it with my own eyes.  He had discovered how to live with AIDS, and he wanted to save people suffering from AIDS and cancer.  I don't think the government wants "How to Grow Medical Marijuana"  to be a bestseller.   They will instead sell you Marinol a synthetic THC.  Jack Herrer  once said " If people stay sick and dying,  the pharmaceutical companies stay in big business"  Yes, marijuana was in the mixture of his AIDS combination cocktail therapy.  No viral load - almost undetectable.  Judge King ordered him off marijuana on November 5, 1999.  From November on we documented his teeth falling out due to his constant vomiting.  He experimented with Marinol (synthetic THC) as a anesthetic.    Using it with no pain killers while the doctors pulled out his teeth, I video taped these gruesome events.  He never cheated the system not even once.  I always would offer marijuana to him but he never accepted.  He loved his mother and brother too much and didn't want to jeopardize losing their homes.

I will always love and miss him

Chris Sanders


Some Comments from Ann concerning Todd and the News of His Friends Death

I just got off the phone with Todd. He's mad, he's sad. He kept breaking down as we talked. I'm still trying to get my mind to accept that this really has happened. I can't believe we'll never see him
again, talk to him.. There won't be any witty emails from Peter when I turn on the computer in the morning. It feels so unreal.

We were so very concerned about him for so long, and recently, he was so happy that his viral load was down again. I spoke with him on the phone when I was in NM on the Global Peace Walk and he was in such good spirits and full of plans for writing projects. In Peter's words, "Hey! I'm going to LIVE!" He was psyched. We talked about his sentencing and he commented that one of the benefits of being a writer was he could write anywhere, even in jail.

He and I were supposed to do a radio interview with Renee Boje and Dick Cowan Monday night and they couldn't reach him on the phone. By then, I hadn't heard from him since Thursday night and I was getting uneasy about that. I had left a few phone messages over the weekend and sent him some emails. He never responded.

Don Wirshafter wrote:

Here are the details I have been able to gather.  It turns out to be a double tragedy.  Last Sunday, Peter had a major fire in his house.  It burnt up the entire downstairs including his computer and backups.  Peter was just weeks away from finishing his book on the ordeal he has gone through.  He was quite excited about it and motivated to finish it.  I heard the firemen had to rescue Peter through his upstairs bedroom window.

The loss of this work threw Peter into shock.  He was not able to talk to anyone these past few days.  The loss of his book was overwhelming to him.

Peter was found in his bathroom choked on his own vomit.  Readers may recall his posting a few weeks back where he described in detail the routine he had worked out to quiet his stomach so it would not reject the cocktail of pills he was prescribed for his AIDS.  Medical marijuana worked perfectly for this purpose, at the time of his arrest his viral count was down to zero.
Federal Judge George King ordered him not to use medical marijuana while he was on federal bond.  Because his mother and brother had put up their houses for this bond, Peter felt obliged to follow this order.  But it meant he could not keep down his medicine and his viral count.

Over a period of time Peter developed a routine of bed rest and other precautions so that he could keep down his medicine.  See: http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v00/n344/a04.html?159127
His health began to return but he asserted that there was not way that he could follow this routine in jail.  He hoped the judge would understand this and sentence him to a period of house arrest.

Peter choked to death due to the lack of a proper anti-emetic.  Forgive me for my anger, but it feels to me that he died as a direct result of the bullshit he was fighting so hard.  California voters passed an
initiative so that seriously ill patients like Peter could use medical marijuana.
Because the federal government is unwilling to face the reality that marijuana is a medicine, Goliath had to crush innocent patients like Peter.  For lack of an proper anti-emetic, Peter died.  I hold the feds responsible.

I pray that somehow a copy of Peter's unfinished work surfaces so that the world can hear his final message to us.  As a movement we need to find some way of honoring Peter and his work.  And we need to redouble our efforts to keep our own government from killing more innocent victims.

With deep respect and loss,

Don Wirtshafter

D. Paul Stanford Wrote:
 

CRRH and HempTV is honored to announce that we now have the video of ABC News' 20/20 on June 9, 2000 featuring Peter McWilliams up on our website in Real Video. You may use the free Real Player to watch this 3 minute, 45 second video clip, which is ABC news reporter John Stoessel's end-of-show segment called, "Give me a break."

The video is at:

http://www.crrh.org/hemptv/news_mcwilliams.html

Peter McWilliams is a martyr, killed in the line of duty by the US federal government in its campaign of intimidation and propaganda called the War on Drugs.  Though this best selling author lived in a state where the sovereign, the people, voted to allow McWilliams and other ill people to use medical marijuana, the federal government persecuted Peter, prosecuting him in federal court for medical marijuana, and a court order denied him the medicine he needed to live. His death is a direct result of the actions of officials of the US federal government.

A couple days after this video aired nationwide on ABC's 20/20, McWilliams final book and computers were destroyed in a mysterious fire at his home. Then, 3  days later, despondent and ill, McWilliams' nausea, caused by the regimen of other life-saving medications he was forced to take for his
illnesses, overwhelmed Peter and he died from asphyxiation.

We wonder, what or who caused the fire at Peter's home 3 days before he died?

Bless you Peter, may your life and death be a further inspiration for change.

Yours truly,
D. Paul Stanford

The Libertarian Party had this to say about Peter McWilliams

Bestselling author Peter McWilliams
is "murdered by the War on Drugs"

        WASHINGTON, DC -- Peter McWilliams, the #1 best selling author and medical marijuana activist who was found dead in California on June 14, was murdered by the War on Drugs, the Libertarian Party charged today.

        "Peter McWilliams would not be dead today if not for the heartless, lethal War on Drugs," said Steve Dasbach, the party's national director. "The federal government killed Peter McWilliams by
denying him the medical marijuana he needed to stay alive as surely as if its drug warriors had put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger.

        "Peter McWilliams may be dead, but the causes he so bravely fought for -- access to life-saving medicine, an end to the War on Drugs, and greater freedom for all Americans -- will live on."

        On Wednesday, McWilliams was found dead in the bathroom of his Los Angeles home. According to sources, he had choked on his vomit.

        McWilliams, 50, had suffered from AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma since 1996, and had used medical marijuana to suppress the nausea that was a common side-effect to the potent medications needed to keep him alive.

        The marijuana was completely legal, thanks to California's Proposition 215, which passed in 1996 and legalized the use of marijuana for treatment of illness. However, in late 1997, McWilliams
was arrested by federal drug agents and charged with conspiracy to sell marijuana.

        After a federal judge ruled that McWilliams could not mention his illnesses at his trial -- or introduce as evidence any of the documented benefits of medical marijuana -- he pled guilty to avoid a 10-year mandatory-minimum prison sentence.

        While out on bail awaiting sentencing, McWilliams was prohibited from using medical marijuana -- and being denied access to the drug's anti-nausea properties almost certainly caused his death,
said Dasbach.

        "First, the federal government arrested McWilliams for doing something that is 100% legal in California," he said. "Then, they put him on trial and wouldn't allow him to introduce the one piece of
evidence that could have explained his actions. Finally, they let him out of jail on the condition that he couldn't use the one medicine that kept him alive.

        "What the federal government did to Peter McWilliams is nothing less that cold-blooded, premeditated murder. A good, decent, talented man is dead because of the bipartisan public policy disaster known as the War on Drugs."

        Ironically, on June 9, McWilliams appeared on the "Give Me A Break!" segment of ABC television's 20/20, where host John Stossel noted, "[McWilliams] is out of prison on the condition that he not
smoke marijuana, but it was the marijuana that kept him from vomiting up his medication. I can understand that the federal drug police don't agree with what some states have decided to do about medical marijuana, but does that give them the right to just end run those laws and lock people up?

        "Give me a break! [It] seems this War on Drugs often does more harm than the drugs themselves."

        Five days later, McWilliams was dead.

        McWilliams, the owner of Prelude Press, was a multi-million- copy-selling author of How to Survive the Loss of a Love, The Personal Computer Book, and DO IT! Let's Get Off Our Buts (with co-author John-Roger), a #1 New York Times bestseller. He also wrote what is widely considered to be the definitive book against "consensual" crimes, Ain't Nobody's Business If You Do.

        He joined the Libertarian Party in 1998 following a nationally televised speech at the Libertarian National Convention in Washington, DC.

        In that speech, McWilliams said, "Marijuana is the finest anti-nausea medication known to science, and our leaders have lied about this consistently. [Arresting people for] medical marijuana is the most hideous example of government interference in the private lives of individuals. It's an outrage within an outrage within an outrage."

        McWilliams' death was also noted by Libertarians in his home state.

        "Peter McWilliams was a true hero who fought and ultimately gave his life for what he believed in: The right to heal oneself without government interference," said Mark Hinkle, state chair of the
California Libertarian Party.

        "His loss opens a gaping hole in the fabric of liberty, but his memory will live on not only in the hearts of grateful Libertarians but also in the lives of the countless patients who will take up the
crusade for health freedom."

Statement Of Author Peter McWilliams To Institute Of Medicine Medical Marijuana Hearings

It has long been my position that, while the suppression of medical marijuana would seem to be peripheral to the Drug War, it is actually central.

See Medical Marijuana and the Internet by Richard Cowan

This is as counterintuitive as is the fact that the earth spins on an axis and revolves around the Sun. It is also as fundamental to understanding how the world works. It does not explain quite everything,
but if you don't understand this, nothing can make any sense. McWilliams elucidates this beautifully.)

Author-publisher Peter McWilliams, whose books have appeared five times on the New York Times Bestseller List, announced today his new publishing imprint, Medical Marijuana Press.

"It's time the truth about medical marijuana was presented by an energetic publishing imprint devoted to that task," said McWilliams. "In the two years since I started using medical marijuana as a result of my AIDS and cancer treatment, I have thoroughly research marijuana, its alleged dangers, and its medical potential. The results have astonished me."

McWilliams is the author or co-author and publisher of more than 35 books over the past 31 years that have sold 10 million copies. All his books are nonfiction. "I'm an investigative reporter," he said, "I
research a subject and report what I learned. When it came to medical marijuana, I learned a lot."

"I found that medical marijuana was an effective treatment for dozens of illnesses and, surprisingly, that marijuana is safer than aspirin-safer than table salt, in fact," said McWilliams. "I also learned the War on Drugs has aimed its entire $50-billion-per-year arsenal against medical marijuana, its users, and its advocates. The War on Drugs is now being fought in the sickrooms of America."

By launching Medical Marijuana Press, McWilliams knows he makes himself a visual advocate-and target.

"On December 17, 1997, three weeks after I announced my book, A Question of Compassion: An AIDS-Cancer Patient Explores Medical Marijuana, nine DEA agents and one IRS Criminal Investigation Special Agent came into my home and handcuffed me," McWilliams said.

"The DEA seized the computer containing the manuscript for A Question of Compassion and several others on medical marijuana," said McWilliams. "The computer was returned a month later, the data scrambled by a virus that had somehow infected it while in DEA custody. Six weeks and several
thousand dollars later, I got back most of my data, but the most recent version of A Question of Compassion was irreparably damaged."

"I consider this a shot fired over my bow from the federal government," McWilliams continued. "The message I took from it: 'If you drop the medical marijuana books, we'll leave you alone. You mess with our livelihood by pushing your medical marijuana, and we'll come after you.'"

In his research, McWilliams discovered that the employees of the Drug War know medical marijuana will topple their lucrative empire. "As soon as the facts about marijuana's broad medical effectiveness and astonishing safety reach the American public, people will realize they have been lied to by the War-on-Drugs folks for more than half a century," said McWilliams. "America will discover that a safe and effective medicine has been kept from them and their loved ones by federal deception since 1937, and America will not be amused."

"That will be the end of the War on Drugs," said McWilliams, "and the end of the careers of quite a few Drug War employees. For example, the entire DEA-a $1.2-billion-a-year federal agency-is completely
unnecessary without marijuana prohibition. The Drug War employees know this, and the campaign to suppress medical marijuana has reached a fevered pace."

McWilliams never considered not publishing his books. "I've spent almost a third of a century in the publishing and bookselling industry," said McWilliams. "Unlike the federal government, we take the First Amendment  seriously-as though it actually means what it says. Writers, publishers, and booksellers have spent time in jail defending it before. If they arrest me, I'll be in very good company."

"If the DEA or IRS arrest me, it will be for what I write and what I plan to publish, not for any drug dealing or tax evading I've done. I have never sold a drug in my life and I pay my taxes."

"The DEA and the IRS have been investigating me for nine months at a cost to taxpayers of more than $3 million," said McWilliams. "They are trying to make me the godfather of some great Medical Marijuana Mafia, the kingpin of the notorious Medicine Cartel. It's all nonsense and they know it."

McWilliams is the author or co-author and publisher of such books as How to Survive the Loss of a Love, DO IT! You Can't Afford the Luxury of a Negative Thought, LIFE 101, How to Heal Depression, Hypericum (St. John's Wort) & Depression, and Ain't Nobody's Business if You Do: The Absurdity of Consensual Crimes in Our Free Country.

"The advertising industry, known for its hyperbole, has taken the "war" side of the War on Drugs-most significantly through its Partnership for a Drug-Free America," observed McWilliams. "I think the
publishing industry should, by contrast, take the side of truth, as it often does in exposing the expedient morality of advertisers and the industries they represent (The Jungle, The Silent Spring, Unsafe at Any Speed, The Merchants of Death). I trust Medical Marijuana Press will be the first of many imprints from publishers on establishing a science- and reason-based drug policy in America."

Medical Marijuana Press announces its first list:

A Question of Compassion: An AIDS-Cancer Patient Explores Medical
Marijuana. (Hardcover, $19.95)

"I owe my life to modern medical science, and to one ancient herb," says McWilliams in this simple explanation of medical marijuana. With little text and illustrated throughout with full-color photographs, it is designed for the first-time medical marijuana patients, their families, and their caregivers. "When I was first diagnosed with AIDS and cancer," said McWilliams, "This is the book I wish someone would have handed me."
 

When asked if he thought the book had a limited market, McWilliams replied, "When the opening sentence of the National Society of Neuroscience October 1997 report on medical marijuana begins, 'New research shows that substances similar to or derived from marijuana, known as cannabinoids, could benefit more than 97 million Americans who experience some form of pain each year," I'd say it had quite a market.

How to Prepare, Purify, and Use Medical Marijuana.

Paperback, 5.95.

This straightforward manual tells how to use a crock pot to make medical marijuana free from bacteria, viruses, molds, and insect droppings, while significantly reducing and pesticide level as well. The process takes less than a day and consumes about ten minutes of human time. (The crock pot does the work.) The finished product, when smoked, does not smell like marijuana at all. While the crock pot's out, the book shows how to make medical marijuana extracts for cooking or encapsulation.
(The capsules can be swallowed or used as suppositories.) Also featured are the best-and worst-ways of inhaling medical marijuana (avoid water pipes), how to roll a joint (use a $5 machine), and how to smoke medical marijuana safely (the patient is playing with fire, after all).

How to Grow Medical Marijuana.

Paperback, $5.95.

Basic, up-to-date information on marijuana cultivation at home. If you don't know the terms mother, clone, and Sea of Green, you don't know the latest about medical marijuana cultivation. Home cultivation not only insures medical marijuana free of pesticides, but it reduces medical marijuana bills by at least 75 percent. You will no longer have to deal with the shifty characters of the drug underworld, but you will have to watch out for the even shiftier characters in narcotics enforcement.
Void where prohibited by law.
 
 

 

"The Big Lie: Medical Marijuana and Our United States Government."

Prior to 1937, medical marijuana was a part of mainstream American medicine. It had been so, under the name cannabis, for almost one hundred years. In 1937, the Congress of the United States was blatantly deceived by the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN), the immediate bureaucratic ancestor of the DEA. Congress was told by the FBN that the American Medical Association favored the 1937 bill banning "the killer weed with its roots in Hell."

In fact, the AMA had strenuously opposed it. "Since the medicinal use of cannabis has not caused and is not causing addiction, the prevention of the use of the drug for medicinal purposes can accomplish no good end whatsoever," the AMA testified before the FBN-controlled subcommittee in 1937. "How far it may serve to deprive the public of the benefits of a drug that on further research may prove to be of substantial value, it is impossible to foresee." Prophetic words, indeed. Who in 1937 could foresee modern cancer treatment and the debilitating nausea it can cause? Who could have foreseen AIDS? Who could have foreseen 100,000 American deaths each year from prescription medications used according to doctor's instructions, and the desperate need we now have for more benign substitutes?

When the bill came up for a vote before the Depression-weary Congress, the FBN said the AMA had approved it. The bill passed on a voice vote after less than two minutes of debate. The government lied to itself and believed it. That was The Big Lie about medical marijuana. For 61 years, the people of the United States have been lied to by their own government about what could be, for millions of Americans, the best medicine. Using government transcripts covering seven decades-with a special emphasis on the more recent post-Proposition 215 federal anti-medical-marijuana rhetoric-McWilliams reveals in a line-by-line analysis of government documents the self-serving deceptions that keep
the war against medical marijuana more viciously fought today than at any point in the past.

"Medical Marijuana and the Treatment of Depression."

While medical marijuana is not a first-line treatment for depression (the herb St. John's wort, prescription antidepressants, and Cognitive or Interpersonal Therapy should be tried first), many sufferers of depression (including McWilliams) have found medical marijuana an excellent adjunct to these treatments. In some intractable cases of depression where medical science cannot seem to help, medical marijuana has provided relief.

McWilliams finds it ironic that a book he co-authored and published-Hypericum (St. John's Wort) & Depression-about another herb marginally more harmful than medical marijuana became a bestseller and launched a $5 million National Institute of Mental Health study on St John's wort's effectiveness, while McWilliams and his meddlings with medical marijuana is the subject of a $3 million DEA-IRS criminal investigation.

"Medical Marijuana and Emotional Loss."

McWilliams, who more than two decades ago originated, co-authored, and published the now-classic How to Survive the Loss of a Love ("One of the ten most recommended books by clinical psychologists to their clients," wrote the New York Times), discusses medical marijuana's unique physiological properties and its effect on emotional loss.

"DEA: The Covert International Military Organization That Creates Its Own War So It Can Keep On Fighting to Win It."

In 1930, when the decade-old "great experiment" of alcohol Prohibition had clearly failed, forward-thinking Prohibition agents started the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN). As America didn't have a drug problem to speak of in 1930, a problem had to be invented. "Marihuana" was the
scapegoat. As the demonic tales of the "marihuana menace" from the FBN grew, so did the FBN. In 1972, the FBN became the DEA and continued with business as usual (including Iran/Contra) and it continues to this day with its "zero tolerance" of medical marijuana.

"The Same People Who Sold Us Cigarettes Are Selling Us The War on Drugs:
The Advertising Industry, The Partnership for a Drug-Free America, and a Dark Day for American Capitalism."

Madison Avenue makes billions selling us tobacco, alcohol, caffeine, and pharmaceutical drugs. Marijuana frightens the advertising industry. It is both a medicine and a recreational high that, if legal, would obviously compete with the far more dangerous drugs the advertising industry sells. Unlike tobacco, alcohol, caffeine, and pharmaceutical drugs, however, marijuana grows readily in any windowbox and obviously needs no advertising.

Marijuana, if legal, would cut deeply into alcohol-tobacco-caffeine-pharmaceutical sales, advertising would fall, and there is no indication that marijuana ads would rise to fill the revenue gaps left by the demise of Joe Camel. To protect its lucrative alcohol-tobacco-caffeine-pharmaceutical accounts, the advertising industry launched in 1987 a multibillion dollar campaign to keep marijuana illegal. Thus far, it has consumed more than $2 billion in public service announcements, the largest public service campaign ever, at the expense of all the other less influential charities vying for precious public service time. (The advertisers have an obvious in with the media-after all, advertising pays the media's bills.)

Now, the advertising industry has landed the biggest sucker account in the world: the United States federal government. Drug Czar General McCaffrey has handed the PDFA $195 million in taxpayer money to buy prime-time ad space for its disinfomercials. Us taxpayers are force to pay $1 each to finance the Partnership for a Drug-Free America's cleverly worded deceptions (AKA brilliant ad copy) about, mostly, marijuana.

It's a dark day for American capitalism when, in order to "stay on top,"
the alcohol-tobacco-caffeine-pharmaceutical advertising agencies, whose legal and heavily advertised products kill 750,000 Americans each year, must attack an herbal medicine that has killed no one and could relieve the suffering of millions. Why but the advertising industry-the greatest
mind-control experts in the history of the world-could then turn around and make the taxpayers finance the whole thing?

"Deeply Disturbed by Their Stubborn Hearts: What Jesus Would Say About
Medical Marijuana."

The religious right has added medical marijuana to the top of its immoral-therefore- it-must-remain-illegal- so-help-us-God list, while the Vatican condemns all marijuana use, even medicinal, as a mortal sin. (It has been, in fact, since 1484 when Pope Innocent VIII added to the
Inquisition's list of burnable offenses possession of marijuana or other "witch herbs.")

(Ed. note:"CORRECTION: In "For the Record" (Feb. 24) NR reported that Pope John Paul II wanted the Italian government to ban tobacco as a hard drug. In fact he was talking about marijuana. So the Pope is right about tobacco, though wrong about pot." National Review Magazine / March 24,
1997 page 6. )

But what do the words of Jesus actually say about useful but "illegal" forms of healing? In healing a blind man, for example, Jesus "spit on the man's eyes"(Mark 8:22-25), and to a deaf mute Jesus, "spit and touched the man's tongue"(Mark 7:32-35).

Hardly FDA-approved medical procedures, to be sure. But they worked. Nevertheless, Jesus was executed by the religious-political leaders of his day (the Pharisees and Herodians) for, among other crimes, healing on the Sabbath. ("Whoever does any work on the Sabbath day must be put to death" [Exodus 31:15].) At Jesus' "trial" by the powerful religious elite, "They brought to the Pharisees the man who had been blind. Now the day on which Jesus had made the mud and opened the man's eyes was a Sabbath. Some of the Pharisees said, 'This man [Jesus] is not from God, for he does not keep the Sabbath.' (John 9:13-14, 16)."

That Jesus healed the blind man didn't matter; that he healed on the Sabbath did. That medical marijuana eases the suffering of millions of sick people does not matter; that marijuana is "immoral, illegal, and wrong, wrong, wrong" does. (Quote from our first Drug Czar William J. Bennett, a Catholic and honorary fundamentalist Christian.)

Perhaps the most telling example of what Jesus would say about medical marijuana is in this event, told by Luke (6:7-11), Matthew (12:9-14), and this recount from Mark 3:1-6: "Another time he went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there. Some of them were looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath. Jesus said to the man with the shriveled hand, 'Stand up in front of everyone.' Then Jesus asked them, 'Which is lawful on the Sabbath: to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?' But they remained silent. He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, 'Stretch out your hand.' He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored. Then the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus."

Luke, the physician, tells of a similar incident before more moderate Pharisees (14:1-6): "One Sabbath, when Jesus went to eat in the house of a prominent Pharisee, he was being carefully watched. There in front of him was a man suffering from dropsy. Jesus asked the Pharisees and
experts in the law, 'Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath or not?' But they remained silent. So taking hold of the man, he healed him and sent him away. Then he asked them, 'If one of you has a son or an ox that falls into a well on the Sabbath day, will you not immediately pull him out?' And they had nothing to say." One wonders what Pat Robertson will have to say.

Unnecessary Death
Orange County Register editorial, June 22, 2000

The drug war claimed another victim last week when author, publisher and activist Peter McWilliams died at his home in Los Angeles. He was 50. Perhaps ironically, he died the same day Governor Ben Cayetano of Hawaii signed a medical marijuana bill passed by the state legislature - making
Hawaii the first state in the country to authorize the medicinal use of marijuana through the legislature rather than by a vote of the people.

An author whose computer how-to books several times made the New York Times best-seller list and whose 'Ain't Nobody's Business if You Do' is destined to be a modern classic, Peter contracted AIDS and cancer a few years ago. He found that marijuana was the best way to control the nausea brought on by both AIDS and cancer treatments and to restore his appetite. He gave writer and patient Todd McCormick a large advance to finance a research project into the medicinal qualities of different strains of marijuana for a book after Proposition 215 passed in 1996, which allows use of marijuana with a
doctor's recommendation. When Todd was arrested in the 'Bel-Air mansion' case, Peter came to his defense, explained that he had financed the project - and got a federal indictment as a 'drug kingpin.'

During and after the trial, Federal District Court Judge George King ordered him not to smoke marijuana. Since his mother and brother had taken out second mortgages on their houses to make his bail and he didn't want to put them in jeopardy, he complied. At first his health deteriorated severely,
but over time he developed a severe regimen of bedrest and other precautions that enabled him to keep his medicines and his viral count down.

On June 11, a fire in his house destroyed Mr. McWilliams' computer and backups, including a book on his ordeal that was almost finished. The loss was overwhelming to him. On Wednesday he was found dead; he had choked on his own vomit.

One can't help but think that if he had been allowed to use the anti-nausea he found most effective, he would still be alive, his intelligence and infectious sense of humor still vital despite the deterioration of his body.
 


 

PETER MCWILLIAMS, R.I.P.

By William F. Buckley

Peter McWilliams is dead.  Age? Fifty.  Profession? Author, poet, publisher.  Particular focus of interest? The federal judge in California (George King) would decide in a few weeks how long a sentence to hand down, and whether to send McWilliams to prison or let him serve his sentence at home.

What was his offense? He collaborated in growing marijuana plants. What was his defense? Well, the judge wouldn't allow him to plead his defense to the jury.  If given a chance, the defense would have argued that under Proposition 215, passed into California constitutional law in 1996, infirm Californians who got medical relief from marijuana were permitted to use it.  The judge also forbade any mention that McWilliams suffered from AIDS and cancer, and got relief from the marijuana.

What was he doing when he died? Vomiting.  The vomiting hit him while in his bathtub, and he choked to death.

Was there nothing he might have done to still the impulse to vomit? Yes, he could have taken marijuana; but the judge's bail terms forbade him to do so, and he submitted to weekly urine tests to confirm that he was living up to the terms of his bail.

Did anybody take note of the risk he was undergoing? He took Marinol - -- a proffered, legal substitute, but reported after using it that it worked for him only about one-third of the time.  When it didn't work, he vomited.

Was there no public protest against the judge's ruling? Yes.  On June 9, the television program "20/20" devoted a segment to the McWilliams plight. Commentator John Stossel summarized:

"McWilliams is out of prison on the condition that he not smoke marijuana, but it was the marijuana that kept him from vomiting up his medication.  I can understand that the federal drug police don't agree with what some states have decided to do about medical marijuana, but does that give them
the right to just end-run those laws and lock people up?"

Shortly after the trial last year, Charles Levendosky, writing in the Ventura County (Calif.) Star, summarized: "The cancer treatment resulted in complete remission." But only the marijuana gave him sustained relief from the vomiting that proved mortal.

Is it being said, in plain language, that the judge's obstinacy resulted in killing McWilliams? Yes.  The Libertarian Party press release has made exactly that charge.  "McWilliams was prohibited from using medical marijuana -- and being denied access to the drug's anti-nausea properties almost certainly caused his death."

Reflecting on the judge's refusal to let the jury know that there was understandable reason for McWilliams to believe he was acting legally, I ended a column in this space in November by writing, "So, the fate of Peter McWilliams is in the hands of Judge King.  Perhaps the cool thing for him to do is delay a ruling for a few months, and just let Peter McWilliams die." Well, that happened last week, on June 14.

The struggle against a fanatical imposition of federal laws on marijuana will continue, as also on the question whether federal laws can stifle state initiatives.  Those who believe the marijuana laws are insanely misdirected have a martyr.

Peter was a wry, mythogenic guy, humorous, affectionate, articulate, shrewd, sassy.  He courted anarchy at the moral level.  His most recent book (his final book) was called "Ain't Nobody's Business If You Do." We were old friends, and I owe my early conversion to word processing to his guidebook on how to do it.  Over the years we corresponded, and he would amiably twit my conservative opinions.  When I judged him to have gone rampant on his own individualistic views in his book, I wrote him to that effect.  I cherish his reply -- nice acerbic deference, the supreme put-down.

"Please remember the Law of Relativity as applied to politics: In order for you to be right, at least someone else must be wrong.  Your rightness is only shown in relation to the other's wrongness.  Conversely, your rightness is necessary for people like me to look truly wrong.  Before Bach, people said of bad organ music, 'That's not quite right.' After Bach, people said flatly, 'That's wrong.' This allowed dedicated composers to grow, and cast the neophytes back to writing how-to-be-happy music.  So, thank me for my wrongness, as so many reviews of my book will doubtless say, 'People should read more of a truly great political commentator:
William F.  Buckley Jr.'"

Imagine such a spirit ending its life at 50, just because they wouldn't let him have a toke.  We have to console ourselves with the comment of the two prosecutors.  They said they were "saddened" by Peter McWilliams' death. We need Nuremberg-like trials for all drug warriors and especially the bastards responsible for McWilliams' death!!!

          By CHRISTOPHER LEHMANN-

          Peter McWilliams, a best-selling author of self-help books who fought for the medicinal use of marijuana, died June 14 at his home in Los Angeles. He was 50 and had AIDS and AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

          Mr. McWilliams caught the crest of the wave of the personal-computer revolution with his highly successful "The Word Processing Book: A Short Course in Computer Literacy" (Prelude Press, 1982). But he gained attention in recent years by advocating, in print and in court, the legalization of marijuana.

          His book "Ain't Nobody's Business if You Do: The Absurdity of Consensual Crimes in a Free Society" (Prelude Press, 1993), which made his case for drug legalization, became a libertarian manifesto. And his arrest in 1997 for growing marijuana became a test of judicial tolerance in California.

          At his death, Mr. McWilliams was waiting to be sentenced in federal court after being convicted of having conspired to possess, manufacture and sell marijuana. He and co-defendant, Todd McCormick, were accused of growing more than 4,000 marijuana plants.

          They pleaded guilty to the charge last year after United States District Judge George H. King ruled that they could not use California's medical marijuana initiative, Proposition 215, as a defense, or even tell the jury of the initiative's existence and their own medical conditions (Mr. McCormick has fused vertebrae from childhood cancer treatment). Federal courts have declined to recognize the initiative, approved by the state's voters in 1996.

          Accused of financing the enterprise, Mr. McWilliams insisted that he was growing the marijuana for cooperatives  supplying the drug to medical patients in California. Government prosecutors contended that he was growing the plants for profit.

          He said that being denied the drug left him nauseated most of the time and without energy. At his last court appearance, he sat slumped in his wheelchair. He was given a diagnosis of lymphoma in 1996. He said that he had not smoked marijuana for years but that upon returning to it he found      that it eased the side effects of chemotherapy.

          Peter Alexander McWilliams was born Aug. 5, 1949, in Detroit, the son of Henry G. and Mary (Taormina) McWilliams. His father was a drugstore supervisor and his mother worked occasionally in sales. He graduated from Allen Park High School and attended Eastern Michigan University, in Ypsilanti, and later studied under Maharishi Mahesh Yogi at Maharishi International University in      Fairfield, Iowa.

          At 17 he wrote his first book, "Come Love with Me and Be My Life," a collection of romantic Poems published by his own Versemonger Press. Among the better known of the nearly 40 books that followed were "Surviving the Loss of a Love" (Versemonger, 1971); "Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned about Life in School but Didn't" (Prelude Press,1990), one of several works he wrote with John-Roger, the pen name of Roger Delano Hinkins, the head of the Church of the Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness, and "Life 202: What to Do When Your Guru Sues You" (Prelude, 1994), Written after the author fell out with John-Roger.

          Mr. McWilliams is survived by his mother, Mary Fadden, and his brother, Michael, both of Allen Park, Mich.

From; Ann McCormick
I have received many inquiries on Peter's statement (below) - rather than answer everyone individually, here are my somewhat random thoughts on the matter - forward as you feel appropriate.

I guess it is time (You were absolutely right, Chuck.) for ALL of this to have a public airing. All other concerns aside, it's time to get tot he bottom of things. It will not bring Peter back. It may help his soul rest more peacefully to know that the truth will get out, despite the loss of his final writings.

For what it is worth...
In my opinion.....

Blame, as credit, deserves to be placed where it is due, not just where it is convenient.

The sole and star witness in Todd and Peter's case - Scott Imler, continues growing and SELLING cannabis in Los Angeles - AND he is being subsidized by the City of West L.A. to do it.

After betraying his friend (Peter) and condemning a well-known activist, researcher, writer and cancer-survivor (Todd), Imler remains untouched. I hold Scott Imler second only to George King in responsibility for Peter's death. The US Attorney's office comes in a not too distant third. The
prosecutors owed nothing to Todd or Peter. They were 'doing their job' - The judge was supposed to temper the prosecutors' demands - He did not. The judge was supposed to find the truth. Instead, he imposed a gag order.

I give the LAPD/County and DEA drug warriors - the rank and file - 4th place on my list of killers.

Imler BETRAYED Peter McWilliams, who thought of Imler as a friend. THAT - by my standards - is UNFORGIVABLE.

We have to question where the cannabis stolen by the authorities from the "Mj Mansion" went. Did Imler get any or all of it?  --Has he received monetary or in-kind compensation from the feds or local authorities?

Why the LACRC is the only club in California not shut down or facing debilitating legal expenses...
Did he, and/or his associates receive copies of  Todd's research notes and records which they are now using for their own gain?

The innocent members of the LACRC should be up in arms. They are the ones being hurt in this. The wolves in sheep's clothing are financially raping them while smiling to their faces and placing arms around their shoulders. Peter THOUGHT these people were his friends, too. He trusted them. He was
their most generous benefactor. Take heed by how they rewarded Peter.

Who stole Todd's passport and bank records from the house at a time when ONLY the drug cops had access to the premises? Who closed Todd's bank account while Todd was in custody? Why wasn't this investigated with the same zealousness the prosecutor displayed in going after Todd and Peter? Why have we not seen bank surveillance tapes of the person who impersonated Todd and withdrew his money from the bank?

What about personal (non-related) items stolen from the house that never appeared on 'official' lists. ONLY the drug cops had access - or - was the informant allowed access, too?

After the raid...
Their bird, Trashy, was dead.
Indy, their dog, was in 'doggy-jail'
Their home, ransacked.
Everything of value removed.
All their hard work destroyed.

Todd's failure to "surrender his passport" was used by the prosecutors to request the high bail - much higher than bail set for violent criminals. Who pocketed/destroyed the passport?

There were 2 separate projects running under the Medical Botanical Foundation, a non-profit Peter set up.

Todd was in charge of writing a cultivation and use guide for Californians under Prop 215. A separate group was exploring ways to distribute organically grown cannabis to medical patients through the buyers' clubs.

There were no distribution or intent to distribute indictments brought against anyone involved in the Bel Air raid.

The distribution charges were inherited through the CONSPIRACY indictments handed down after Peter's arrest in '98.

The men involved in the exploration of distribution methods for buyers clubs were not doing anything wrong, either. They were trying to fill in a gap left open by the poor wording of Prop 215 and to PROTECT marijuana patients from the prices and lack of quality controls of the black market. Most of the
California growers are honorable, caring people. As in any business, some are not. Novices, buying marijuana on the streets do not know whether the mj they are buying is adulterated or pure. Peter's concern was for consistent purity from toxic chemicals. Someone whose health is already compromised does not
need to smoke chemical fertilizers or insecticides.

Imler has presented himself as a 'victim' dragged before the grand jury, forced to testify. This is blatantly untrue. He was neither a victim, nor was he dragged.

We have to look at the timing of the initial raid. Imler told Peter in May of 1997 that he wanted "the pot the guy is growing in Bel Air".  Peter reluctantly agreed to relay that message to Todd.

Todd emphatically told Peter to tell Scott NONE OF IT WAS FOR SALE. IT WOULD BE GIVEN -FREE - TO BONA FIDE MED MJ PATIENTS IN CALIFORNIA.

The timing of the raid was AFTER most of the cultivation research had been compiled and a week BEFORE the initial harvest and FREE distribution to cannabis patients in California.

The judge who approved the warrant on the Stone Canyon house was not told of the MEDICAL association. The cops who grabbed Renee an hour BEFORE entering the house were well aware that this was a MEDICAL marijuana garden and under THEIR OWN STATE LAW they had no legal right to proceed with the raid. It would appear that their motives were less than law-abiding and honest when they chose to proceed anyway.

The raid was conducted by LA city/county authorities. The DEA was called in AFTER the fact.

WHO has copies of  Todd's and Peter's work?

WHERE did the harvested cannabis go?

With Peter's death, Todd's captivity and Renee's quest for asylum - these questions scream out for answers.
with sadness,
ann

(Who sincerely wishes Imler had taken time to THINK of ALL the possible tragedies his actions would cause BEFORE dropping the dime to destroy his perceived 'competition', protect his profits and destroy so many innocent lives with his own greed and jealousy)

That's my 2 cents.

I now, individually, need to let this anger go- I leave it in God's hands - and yours.
 
 

Subject: Rev.  Imler & Richard Nixon
From: "McWilliams Main" <peter@mcwilliams.com>
To: "Peter McWilliams" <peter@mcwilliams.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 20:39:09 -0800
From: Peter McWilliams...

What a piece of work is Scott Imler.  I nominate him for the Richard Nixon Chutzpa Award.

Remember when Nixon was cornered about Watergate and the Supreme Court ordered him to turn over the transcripts of his taped White House conversations?  Nixon did so, on national television, proudly gesturing to the stack of dozens of volumes of transcribed tapes behind him.  "This
will prove my innocence!" he proclaimed.

In fact, it proved beyond a shadow of a doubt his guilt.

I guess Nixon figured nobody would actually read the thousands of pages to find the smoking guns hidden in the text.

Yesterday, Rev.  Imler circulated the federal indictment in my case far and wide.  One can almost hear the voice of Richard Nixon in Imler's introduction to the federal prosecution's case against me:

"Attached is the federal indictment of Peter, Todd, and friends. People can judge the allegations and facts for themselves and Hoping [sic] get a better sense of the overall context."

In other words, Rev.  Imler is using a federal document as his defense. We are asked to believe the feds in a drug case, something no drug-reform person is likely to do.  Rev. Imler concludes his introduction:

"I apologize for the appalling length, but you'll have to take that up with Peter.
"Scott Imler"

So I am to blame for the length of the federal indictment?  All I can say is that if Imler talked less, it would be a lot shorter.

But let us assume for a moment that everything in the indictment were absolutely true.  The indictment contains no evidence of drug dealing, no cash seized, no firearms, no income unaccounted for, no exchange of money for drugs, and no drugs other than marijuana.  All indicted parties were
vocal medical marijuana advocates and had either a physician's permission or were caregivers.  All "alleged acts" took place in California after the passage of Proposition 215.

And it absolves Imler of nothing.

After wading through 200 paragraphs of its eight counts, what the indictment describes is (a) medical marijuana patients and caregivers growing medical marijuana for their own use, well within the limits of Proposition 215, (b) lots of transfers of money from me to Todd McCormick for a book he was writing for my publishing company ("How to Grow Medical Marijuana," see www.growmedicine.com) and (c) severance pay to Andrew Scott Hass, a medical marijuana patient who ran my publishing company, Prelude Press, for a while.

Rev.  Imler presented the full indictment in three long e-mails, knowing full well very few people are going to wade through page after page of dreary federal prose.  His implication is that SOMEWHERE IN HERE we see that McCormick and McWilliams are BAD and Imler is somehow vindicated from
being a snitch.

But even a casual reading reveals Rev.  Imler as the informant that he is.  I maintain that most of what he said is false, but even if it were true, the fact that this information came to the feds through Imler is
indisputable.  To save you the time of reading it all, I have excerpted the best bits below.

The following points of the federal indictment, circulated by Rev. Imler, came entirely from Rev.  Imler's testimony and the testimony of two of his "employees" at the Los Angeles Buyer's Club, both named Jeff.

"11.  Defendant PETER McWILLIAMS would attempt to negotiate contracts for the sale of harvested marijuana and marijuana plant clones."

My plan, in fact, was (and still is) to use my nonprofit 501(c)3 company, the Medical Botanical Foundation, to get medical marijuana into pharmacies, just like any other medication.  When I told Rev.  Imler this, he turned white.  It would, after all, put his "Club" out of business. Were I to guess, I would say this had something to do with Rev.  Imler's more-than-enthusiastic desire for my arrest.  That meeting with Mr. Imler in May or June 1997 at my house appeared again at:

"36.  In or about May, 1997, in Los Angeles, California, defendant PETER McWILLIAMS asked an employee of the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyers' Club whether the club was interested in buying marijuana."

The "employee," as you may have guessed, is Rev.  Imler.  As there were only two people there, and as I have not talked to the feds about it, the only place the feds could have gotten this information is from Rev. Imler himself.  As anyone following federal drug cases knows, that statement alone from Rev.  Imler is enough to put me away for ten-year-to-life for "conspiracy." No drugs need to change hands for a "conspiracy" count to stick.  But Rev.  Imler was far from vague in his accusations, as the following point from the indictment circulated by Imler clearly reveals:

"55.  In or about June, 1997, in Los Angeles, California, defendant PETER McWILLIAMS told an employee of the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer' s Club that he was funding defendant TODD McCORMICK's marijuana grow at the Stone Canyon residence, that he wanted to become the "Bill Gates of medical marijuana," that "they" intended to become and distribute high quality marijuana clones through the mail, and that he wanted to enter into a grow contract with the club for the sale of marijuana at $4,800 per pound."

What I said was that I wanted to be the Larry Flynt of medical marijuana; that I wanted to do for green what Larry had done for pink. Through the Medical Marijuana Foundation I intended (and still do) to be "the largest supplier of medical marijuana in the country..." but only legally and only though pharmacies after medical marijuana had been made a Schedule II prescription drug.  The rest of it, right down to the price per pound, is all from Rev.  Imler's imagination.  One can just imagine DEA
agents and federal prosecutors pressing Imler for more incriminating details, and Imler provided them.  Yes, not only is he a snitch, but he is a dishonest snitch.

After Todd's bust on July 29, 1997, the first federal medical marijuana bust since the passage of 215 in November 1996, I immediately donated everything I had to an organization I still believed was dedicated to getting medical marijuana to the sick, the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club.

"110.  On or about August, 1997, in Los Angeles, California, defendant PETER McWILLIAMS attempted to distribute numerous marijuana plants, grow lights and other equipment to the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club in order to prevent the discovery of the marijuana grow at the 8165 Mannix
residence.

"111.  In or about August, l997, at the 8165 Mannix residence, defendants PETER McWILLIAMS and ANDREW SCOTT HASS, distributed processed marijuana, numerous grow lights, light movers, fans, timers and electrical equipment to employees of the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club in order to
prevent the discovery of the marijuana grow at the 8165 Mannix residence."

Here's I'm giving Imler all this stuff for free, and all the while he's freely talking to the DEA about my donations.  The lights, light movers, etc.  I donated, but no "processed marijuana." More Imler-DEA-federal invention.

"112.  In on or about August, 1997, in Los Angeles, California, defendant ANDREW SCOTT HASS discussed with employees of the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club his role in setting up the indoor marijuana cultivation room at the Stone Canyon residence, the creation of an electronically
controlled, indoor, hydroponic marijuana grow at the club's office, and the distribution of defendant PETER McWILLIAMS' marijuana plants to the club."

I can guarantee you that Andrew Scott Hass never told the feds any of this, which leaves the source of information as "employees of the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club." What I had offered to do, in fact, was install a state-of-the-art hydroponic system at the Club as a donation. Andrew Scott Hass and I were researching the most efficient ways of cultivating medical marijuana for the Medical Botanical Foundation.  As Imler at that time had had several disasters in growing marijuana for
his Club, I offered assistance.  Although I was not part of the conversation described in 112, I have a feeling Imler invented much of it.  Hass, for example, seldom went to Todd's house ("the Stone Canyon Residence"), so "his role in setting up the indoor marijuana cultivation room at the Stone
Canyon residence" at Todd's strains my credulity.

"113.  In or about August, 1997, in Los Angeles, California.  defendants PETER McWILLIAMS and ANDREW SCOTT HASS offered to sell the Los Angeles Cannabis Buyer's Club marijuana at $4,000 per pound."

Reduced from $4,800, apparently.  More Imler DEA-induced fantasy, as far as I can tell.  Note the inconsistency in the stories.  At 111 I "distributed processed marijuana" to the Club for no money, then I turn around and try to sell marijuana for $4,000 a pound.  At what point did I turn from  being one of the Club's most generous benefactors to being a greedy supplier?  And why was this sale never consummated?  Where's the money?

But, again, this is not about what I did or did not do.  A jury will determine that, and I will either spend the rest of my life in prison or I will not.  (A 10-year mandatory minimum is a death sentence to anyone with AIDS.) The point is that Imler gave enough information about Hass, McCormick, and me to put us all away.

And all this is from the "evidence" supplied by Imler to prove his innocence as an informer.

Todd McCormick, the other co-defendants, and myself face a possible life prison sentence, with a mandatory minimum of ten years.  Even were all charges dropped tomorrow, the past year-and-a-half has been a living hell for all of us.  Nevertheless, Rev.  Imler chooses to refer to the indictment that might destroy the lives of nine harmless medical marijuana advocates as "McDictment."

Oh, he's so clever.

Finally, there has been some talk about violence against Rev.  Imler.  I am wholly opposed to this.  I doubt if anyone seriously intends to harm Imler.  I tend to think the rhetoric just get a bit heated at times. After all, the name of a popular sitcom is "Just Shoot Me." Those of us in the medical marijuana movement are motivated by healing, not violence.  It's time to declare peace on drugs, not war on snitches.

At the same time, consider Imler armed and dangerous: he is armed with home phone numbers of DEA agents and he will use them to report any contact you may make with him.

Sincerely, Peter McWilliams
peter@mcwilliams.com
www.mcwilliams.com
www.marijuanamagazine.com

Libertarian Party Press Releases
June 17, 2000
Bestselling author Peter McWilliams is "murdered by the War on Drugs"

WASHINGTON, DC -- Peter McWilliams, the #1 bestselling author and medical marijuana activist who was found dead in California on June 14, was murdered by the War on Drugs, the Libertarian Party charged today.

"Peter McWilliams would not be dead today if not for the heartless, lethal War on Drugs," said Steve Dasbach, the party's national director. "The federal government killed Peter McWilliams by denying him the medical marijuana he needed to stay alive as surely as if its drug warriors had put a gun to    his head and pulled the trigger.

"Peter McWilliams may be dead, but the causes he so bravely fought for -- access to life-saving medicine, an end to the War on Drugs, and greater freedom for all Americans -- will live on."

On Wednesday, McWilliams was found dead in the bathroom of his Los Angeles home. According to sources, he had choked on his vomit. McWilliams, 50, had suffered from AIDS and non-Hodgkin's    lymphoma since 1996, and had used medical marijuana to suppress the nausea that was a common side-effect to the potent medications needed to keep him alive.

The marijuana was completely legal, thanks to California's Proposition 215, which passed in 1996 and legalized the use of marijuana for treatment of illness. However, in late 1997, McWilliams was arrested by federal drug agents and charged with conspiracy to sell marijuana.

After a federal judge ruled that McWilliams could not mention his illnesses at his trial -- or introduce as evidence any of the documented benefits of medical marijuana -- he pled guilty to avoid a 10-year mandatory-minimum prison sentence.

While out on bail awaiting sentencing, McWilliams was prohibited from using medical marijuana -- and being denied access to the drug's anti-nausea properties almost certainly caused his death, said Dasbach.

First, the federal government arrested McWilliams for doing something that is 100% legal in California," he said. "Then, they put him on trial and wouldn't allow him to introduce the one piece of evidence that could have explained his actions. Finally, they let him out of jail on the condition that he couldn't use the one medicine that kept him alive.

"What the federal government did to Peter McWilliams is nothing less that cold-blooded, premeditated murder. A good, decent, talented man is dead because of the bipartisan public      policy disaster known as the War on Drugs."

Ironically, on June 9, McWilliams appeared on the "Give Me A Break!" segment of ABC Television's 20/20, where host John Stossel noted, "[McWilliams] is out of prison on the condition that he not smoke marijuana, but it was the marijuana that kept him from vomiting up his medication. I can understand that the federal drug police don't agree with what some states have decided to do about medical marijuana, but does that give them the right to just end run those laws and lock people up?

"Give me a break! [It] seems this War on Drugs often does more harm than the drugs themselves."
Five days later, McWilliams was dead.

McWilliams, the owner of Prelude Press, was a multi-million-copy-selling author of How to Survive the Loss of a Love, The Personal Computer Book, and DO IT! Let's Get Off Our Buts (with co-author John-Roger), a #1 New York Times bestseller. He also wrote what is widely considered to be the
definitive book against "consensual" crimes, Ain't Nobody's Business If You Do.

He joined the Libertarian Party in 1998 following a nationally televised speech at the Libertarian National Convention in Washington, DC.  In that speech, McWilliams said, "Marijuana is the finest
anti-nausea medication known to science, and our leaders have lied about this consistently. [Arresting people for] medical marijuana is the most hideous example of government                         interference in the private lives of individuals. It's an outrage within an outrage within an outrage." 

McWilliams' death was also noted by Libertarians in his home state. "Peter McWilliams was a true hero who fought and ultimately gave his life for what he believed in: The right to heal oneself        without government interference," said Mark Hinkle, state chair of the California Libertarian Party.     "His loss opens a gaping hole in the fabric of liberty, but his memory will live on not only in the hearts of grateful Libertarians but also in the lives of the countless patients who will take up the crusade for health freedom."

Many of us are -- by his death and the causes of it.


UNDER CONSTRUCTION
EULOGY BY MIKKI NORRIS and CHRIS CONRAD

Todd McCormick in Jail for a possible 5 years

PARDON TODD PATRICK MCCORMICK IMMEDIATELY
By Ann McCormick
Please see Ann's Website for further updates!
RENEE BOJE

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